21 year old charged in death of Renton man

A physical altercation turned deadly Nov. 30 at the Renton Ridge Apartment complex.

Cristian A. Magana-Arevalo, 21, was charged with first degree murder following the death of Jason Philip-David Hobbs Jr., 21, on Nov. 30 in Renton.

He is currently in custody on $1 million bond. His arraignment is scheduled for 9 a.m. Dec. 27 at the Regional Justice Center in Kent.

According to charging documents, around 6:30 p.m. Nov. 30 Hobbs was shot multiple times and killed in the parking lot at the Renton Ridge Apartments.

According to an associate medical examiner, Hobbs was shot a total of six times.

Following the investigation, Renton police believe Magana-Arevalo arrived at the apartment complex to physically fight Hobbs.

The charging documents stated, Magana-Arevalo and another man, later identified as his brother, reportedly fought Hobbs. That is when Hobbs reportedly fell to the ground and was then shot several times by Magana-Arevalo.

Police believe Magana-Arevalo’s motive for killing Hobbs was because he believed Hobbs was involved in a prior shooting that targeted Magana-Arevalo’s family.

Detectives spoke with a subject, E.C., who lives at the apartment complex. He told them that earlier in the day he saw Magana-Arevalo at a local Subway. He added that Magana-Arevalo and Hobbs were talking while at Subway and “appeared they settled something,” according to charging documents.

Hobbs reportedly dropped E.C. off at his apartment following the meet up at Subway. Then he spoke with Magana-Arevalo’s brother, Jose, on the phone about why Hobbs was reportedly “messing with his brother.”

Jose reportedly told E.C. that he wanted to meet Hobbs for a fight. E.C. told Jose that he could arrange for him, Magana-Arevalo and Hobbs to meet at his apartment but Hobbs insisted no guns be involved.

Hobbs reportedly texted E.C. that he was three minutes away and Jose also let E.C. know that they had arrived at the complex. E.C. reportedly told officers that a few minutes after Jose told him they had arrived, he heard multiple gunshots.

He added that he saw Hobbs’ car in the parking lot and Hobbs laying on the ground near the bottom of a staircase.

Detectives spoke with another witness, P.E., who told them he had followed Hobbs to the apartment complex but decided to park a few blocks away. According to charging documents, P.E. waited about 20 minutes before leaving the scene because “something didn’t feel right.”

Later he learned that Hobbs had been killed, the documents added.

On Dec. 1, detectives executed a search warrant at Magana-Arevalo’s apartment where a H&K gun box was located. This box was consistent with one that would hold a .357 H&K pistol, which was determined to be the murder weapon.

Also during the search, detectives asked Magana-Arevalo if he knew why they were there. He reportedly told detectives that he has an idea because of something he had seen on Facebook about someone being shot.

The charging documents stated, Magana-Arevalo reportedly told officers he was with his family all day.

While detectives continued to talk with Magana-Arevalo, he reportedly told them he had gone shopping and to Subway with his girlfriend and son and they had returned home around 7 to 8 p.m. the day before. He also said he doesn’t talk to his brother but later said the last time he saw him was the morning of Nov. 30.

The charging documents continued, stating that Magana-Arevalo said his vehicle hadn’t left his apartment complex for a couple days.

Magana-Arevalo reportedly changed his story, telling detectives that he did know Hobbs.

He told detectives that his cousin’s house had previously been shot at in July 2018 while his girlfriend and son were outside the home. He added he believed Hobbs was involved with the shooting.

Magana-Arevalo told detectives he saw E.C. and Hobbs at Subway on Nov. 30 and briefly spoke to Hobbs. He reportedly told him “I don’t have no problem with you guys, I’m always with my family. I don’t shoot at people’s families,” documents stated. Adding, Magana-Arevalo said “I’m not involved in any of the problems you have with everybody else in the Highlands.”

He claimed he felt threatened because Hobbs reportedly said he always keeps his gun tucked, charging documents stated.

While talking with Magana-Arevalo’s girlfriend, she told detectives he had been with her and their son all day and once they returned home he did not leave again.

Detectives again spoke with Magana-Arevalo on Dec. 3, this time regarding the gun box that was found at his apartment. He reportedly told officers that he doesn’t always live at that address, he also lives with his uncle sometimes.

Charging documents stated Magana-Arevalo told detectives the gun box was inside his vehicle when it was returned to him after being stolen in May 2018.

When asked if his DNA would be found on items from the crime scene including the gun magazine, he reportedly told detectives that himself and his brother had touched the box and magazine when it was found in his returned car, but had since sold or gotten rid of them.

According to the charging documents, detectives noted he was conceding that his DNA may be found on the items but was attempting to explain why and how.

Detectives spoke with Kirkland Police and determined there was not a gun box in the vehicle when it was returned.

Charging documents stated Magana-Arevalo has minimal criminal history but due to the nature of the killing, he presents an extreme risk to the community.


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