3 chances to show that Renton cares 3 chances to show that Renton cares

Thousands have found medical care, not to mention food, in the last few years at that wonderful building on South Tobin Street, The Renton Rotary Salvation Army Food Bank and Service Center.

Thousands have found medical care, not to mention food, in the last few years at that wonderful building on South Tobin Street, The Renton Rotary Salvation Army Food Bank and Service Center.

The Renton Rotacare Saturday clinic is one of two community efforts the Renton Reporter has highlighted in recent issues. The other is the Way Back Inn, a venerable institution that for nearly 20 years has helped find a temporary home for those less fortunate in Renton and other cities in South King County.

Together, along with other such non-governmental programs, they are a perfect example of how Renton residents have opened their hearts and their pocketbooks to fill those troublesome gaps in the lives of others.

The food bank exists today thanks to a generous donation by the Rotary Club of Renton, which continues to support the clinic.

Both community organizations are run almost exclusively by volunteers and can always use some support. I’ve included with my column how to donate to both organizations.

Every vote counts

for school bond

The $150 million bond issue for critical capital needs in the Renton School District will go before voters in May. This time, it’s an all-mail election; no tromping to the polls. The loss in the February election was whisper thin. Less than 100 votes would have made a difference for the kids. The job isn’t quite done yet.

So, next month, when the ballots arrive, it will take just a minute or two to vote (yes, please). By the way, vote early to save a penny on the first-class stamp, which goes up to 42 cents on May 12. That 41-cent stamp will give you a very good return on the investment – and so would a 42-cent one.

Dean A. Radford can be reached at 425-255-3484, extension 5050, or at dean.radford@rentonreporter.com.

Thousands have found medical care, not to mention food, in the last few years at that wonderful building on South Tobin Street, The Renton Rotary Salvation Army Food Bank and Service Center.

The Renton Rotacare Saturday clinic is one of two community efforts the Renton Reporter has highlighted in recent issues. The other is the Way Back Inn, a venerable institution that for nearly 20 years has helped find a temporary home for those less fortunate in Renton and other cities in South King County.

Together, along with other such non-governmental programs, they are a perfect example of how Renton residents have opened their hearts and their pocketbooks to fill those troublesome gaps in the lives of others.

The food bank exists today thanks to a generous donation by the Rotary Club of Renton, which continues to support the clinic.

Both community organizations are run almost exclusively by volunteers and can always use some support. I’ve included with my column how to donate to both organizations.

Every vote counts

for school bond

The $150 million bond issue for critical capital needs in the Renton School District will go before voters in May. This time, it’s an all-mail election; no tromping to the polls. The loss in the February election was whisper thin. Less than 100 votes would have made a difference for the kids. The job isn’t quite done yet.

So, next month, when the ballots arrive, it will take just a minute or two to vote (yes, please). By the way, vote early to save a penny on the first-class stamp, which goes up to 42 cents on May 12. That 41-cent stamp will give you a very good return on the investment – and so would a 42-cent one.

Dean A. Radford can be reached at 425-255-3484, extension 5050, or at dean.radford@rentonreporter.com.

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