King County Flood Control District approves funding for salmon recovery

  • Friday, September 7, 2018 1:22pm
  • Life
From the Reporter archive: Two salmon swim past the downtown Renton library in 2013.

From the Reporter archive: Two salmon swim past the downtown Renton library in 2013.

The following are two news releases from King County Flood Control District:

On Aug. 6, the King County Flood Control District approved nearly $1.7 million in grants to protect the Cedar River Watershed or Watershed Resource Inventory Area (WRIA) Eight. These funds were part of $4.6 million the District approved as part of the Cooperative Watershed Management Grant Program.

“With these funds, we’ll be able to protect salmon along with the local watershed,” said supervisor Dave Upthegrove. “Our region will certainly benefit from the high quality work of the grant recipients.”

“When we invest in restoring King County’s critical habitats we invest in the future of our region’s ecosystems,” said Reagan Dunn, Chair of the Flood Control District. “I look forward to seeing the results of these projects throughout our four major watersheds.”

Over $766,000 will go towards King County’s Riverbend Floodplain Restoration Construction project that focuses on reconnecting the Cedar River to its floodplain, The project focuses on approximately 52 acres of floodplain which will provide flood storage and habitat restoration for multiple salmon species.

“The City of Renton, a member of the Lake Washington/Cedar River/ Sammamish Watershed WRIA 8 Salmon Recovery Council, would like to thank King County Flood Control District for approving the grant,” said Renton Mayor Denis Law. “The project reconnects floodplain and restores habitat, improving habitat for Chinook salmon in our regional salmon recovery effort. The floodplain restoration will also provide secondary flood reduction benefits to upstream and downstream properties in the area.”

Grant recipients participating in the Cooperative Watershed Management Grant Program must address high priority habitats or watershed processes that significantly influence productivity in each basin. To ensure high quality projects, only those that have been scientifically vetted and ranked competitively by their respective WRIA Forum are candidates for funding. Cities, towns, special districts, public schools, King County, federally recognized tribes and non-profits are eligible to apply for the grants.

On Aug. 6 the King County Flood Control District also approved $100,000 in grants toward Lower Taylor Creek to support ongoing Chinook salmon recovery efforts in the Lake Washington/Cedar/Sammamish Watershed or Watershed Resource Inventory Area (WRIA) Eight. These funds were part of $4.6 million the District approved as part of the Cooperative Watershed Management Grant Program.

“The Lower Taylor Creek Restoration funding is an important step towards the final design and permitting for that project,” supervisor Larry Gossett said. “Once completed, this project will provide rearing and refuge habitat for juvenile Chinook salmon exciting the Cedar River.”

“When we invest in restoring King County’s critical habitats we invest in the future of our region’s ecosystems,” said Reagan Dunn, Chair of the Flood Control District. “I look forward to seeing the results of these projects throughout our four major watersheds.”

“We appreciate this additional grant funding from the King County Flood Control District,” said Mami Hara, general manager and CEO of Seattle Public Utilities. “This project will provide a critical first resting stop for juvenile Chinook as they leave the Cedar River into Lake Washington.”

Lower Taylor Creek Restoration Final Design and Permitting sponsored by Seattle Public Utilities will receive $100,000. This funding will be used to complete 90 percent of the design and permitting for the Lower Taylor Creek Project, which will provide rearing and refuge habitat for juvenile Chinook salmon out-migrating from the Cedar River.

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