King County Flood Control District approves funding for salmon recovery

  • Friday, September 7, 2018 1:22pm
  • Life
From the Reporter archive: Two salmon swim past the downtown Renton library in 2013.

From the Reporter archive: Two salmon swim past the downtown Renton library in 2013.

The following are two news releases from King County Flood Control District:

On Aug. 6, the King County Flood Control District approved nearly $1.7 million in grants to protect the Cedar River Watershed or Watershed Resource Inventory Area (WRIA) Eight. These funds were part of $4.6 million the District approved as part of the Cooperative Watershed Management Grant Program.

“With these funds, we’ll be able to protect salmon along with the local watershed,” said supervisor Dave Upthegrove. “Our region will certainly benefit from the high quality work of the grant recipients.”

“When we invest in restoring King County’s critical habitats we invest in the future of our region’s ecosystems,” said Reagan Dunn, Chair of the Flood Control District. “I look forward to seeing the results of these projects throughout our four major watersheds.”

Over $766,000 will go towards King County’s Riverbend Floodplain Restoration Construction project that focuses on reconnecting the Cedar River to its floodplain, The project focuses on approximately 52 acres of floodplain which will provide flood storage and habitat restoration for multiple salmon species.

“The City of Renton, a member of the Lake Washington/Cedar River/ Sammamish Watershed WRIA 8 Salmon Recovery Council, would like to thank King County Flood Control District for approving the grant,” said Renton Mayor Denis Law. “The project reconnects floodplain and restores habitat, improving habitat for Chinook salmon in our regional salmon recovery effort. The floodplain restoration will also provide secondary flood reduction benefits to upstream and downstream properties in the area.”

Grant recipients participating in the Cooperative Watershed Management Grant Program must address high priority habitats or watershed processes that significantly influence productivity in each basin. To ensure high quality projects, only those that have been scientifically vetted and ranked competitively by their respective WRIA Forum are candidates for funding. Cities, towns, special districts, public schools, King County, federally recognized tribes and non-profits are eligible to apply for the grants.

On Aug. 6 the King County Flood Control District also approved $100,000 in grants toward Lower Taylor Creek to support ongoing Chinook salmon recovery efforts in the Lake Washington/Cedar/Sammamish Watershed or Watershed Resource Inventory Area (WRIA) Eight. These funds were part of $4.6 million the District approved as part of the Cooperative Watershed Management Grant Program.

“The Lower Taylor Creek Restoration funding is an important step towards the final design and permitting for that project,” supervisor Larry Gossett said. “Once completed, this project will provide rearing and refuge habitat for juvenile Chinook salmon exciting the Cedar River.”

“When we invest in restoring King County’s critical habitats we invest in the future of our region’s ecosystems,” said Reagan Dunn, Chair of the Flood Control District. “I look forward to seeing the results of these projects throughout our four major watersheds.”

“We appreciate this additional grant funding from the King County Flood Control District,” said Mami Hara, general manager and CEO of Seattle Public Utilities. “This project will provide a critical first resting stop for juvenile Chinook as they leave the Cedar River into Lake Washington.”

Lower Taylor Creek Restoration Final Design and Permitting sponsored by Seattle Public Utilities will receive $100,000. This funding will be used to complete 90 percent of the design and permitting for the Lower Taylor Creek Project, which will provide rearing and refuge habitat for juvenile Chinook salmon out-migrating from the Cedar River.

More in Life

See Binetti host Container Wars daily at show

Time to take a trip around the world — just by making… Continue reading

Illustrations by Rob McClurkan
Dr. Universe tells us how many bones dinosaurs have

Ask Dr. Universe is a science-education column from Washington State University.

Polo and Tugs got out of Monica Sauerwein’s house on Jan. 27. They were later found thatafternoon. Thanks to someone, Tugs was found and taken to a vet to see if he was chipped. Polo returned home on his own not long after. Submitted photo from Monica Saurerwein.
What to know about pet licensing

Licensing your pet is one of the best ways to ensure lost pets make it back home. Renton Animal Control and RASKC are important resources for pet owners in and out of Renton.

Search no more, you’ll want to read ‘Hero Dogs’

You felt like such a loser. It was a feeling that didn’t… Continue reading

Whether you like mystery or humor, this book has it for you

You didn’t recognize the number. So you didn’t answer the phone. That’s… Continue reading

Third times a charm? New restaurant set to open on MV highway

Weather permitting, Mezcal Fresh Mexican Grill opens Thursday, Feb. 7

Photo from the GoFundMe of some of the fallen trees
SHADOW Lake Nature Reserve wants your help

During the windstorm in early January, the boardwalk trail at the Shadow… Continue reading

Candy Cane Lane receives surprise donations

Folks gave $1,250 to go to a shed that will hold all the decorations

Urban Sprouts owner launches book Saturday

“The Inspired Houseplant” is meant to guide beginners through indoor plant life.

Four ways to celebrate spring in the winter

The beginning of February starts the gardening season – once you see… Continue reading

Illustrations by Rob McClurkan
Dr. Universe explains molecules

Ask Dr. Universe is a science-education column from Washington State University.

A book full of heart-pounding adventure, bravery, thrills and heroics

You never wanted to get caught. Wasn’t that the point of playing… Continue reading