King County and my grassy lawn

King County and my grassy lawn

King County and my grassy lawn

Do people know that some King County officials don’t like residents to have grassy lawns?

I live east of Renton in King County. I have a small stream flowing through my yard to May Creek. In 1990, we started getting yearly floods, sand bars, and were unable to use our property for seven years.

I called King County surface water management for help in 1995. I was told that we qualified for help — but the person writing the report left county employment and since that time, we’ve been told that because our damage is to our lawn, we won’t be getting any help.

In addition, it seems that the Water and Land Resources (WLRD) staff can’t see the damage occurring, like sediment settling on the bottom of the stream. If you really want to see what King County doesn’t do to help people with yearly flood damage, check out May Creek in East King County after a large rainfall. These poor people are inundated with lakes that don’t dry up, and the county doesn’t do anything to help them. In 1995, a report was done on our problem and we got a copy of it. I recently found out that someone at WLRD revisited the report in order to make King County officials look good. We never got a copy of that report. It’s almost like President Trump hiding his income tax information. What is the county hiding?

And why should the report be changed? Like I said, now over and over again, King County can say, “it’s just grass — we can’t help you.”

Claudia Donnelly, Renton




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