Original sketch of suspect from King County Sheriff’s Office. Suspect is now identified as Kevin J. Perkins.

Original sketch of suspect from King County Sheriff’s Office. Suspect is now identified as Kevin J. Perkins.

Update: Suspect in August kidnapping booked

The attempted attack occurred on Aug. 13 in unincorporated King County.

The suspect in an attempted kidnapping from August has been identified and booked into King County jail.

Kevin J. Perkins was identified using DNA, according to King County Sheriff”s Office. After identification, a $500,000 warrant for first degree kidnapping was issued.

On Thursday Oct. 4, Perkins was arrested in Tukwila. The Sheriff’s office said this was with the help of U.S. Marshals and the King County warrants unit. No other information has been released at this time.

The following is from the original article:

On Monday, Aug. 13 around 11:45 p.m. a 16-year-old was turning the corner of South 272 Street and 42 Avenue South in unincorporated King County when she spotted the SUV on the side of the roadway.

She stopped her jog when she saw the suspect standing outside the vehicle. Deciding things were weird, she chose to turn around when he grabbed her.

The suspect grabbed her throat and pushed her into the SUV driver’s seat.

The survivor struggled as the suspect was getting her pants partially down but kicked the suspect, knocking him over. She then began to scream and honk the horn of the car. She also said she was able to scratch the suspect’s face.

When he got back up the suspect grabbed her again, but she removed her sweatshirt to break free. He then grabbed her leg and the survivor’s shoe came off, but she was able to run away and flag down a passing vehicle for help.

The suspect is believed to be a white male in his 50s wearing all dark clothing. He was 6-foot-2 with a thin build and salt-and-pepper shoulder length hair.

The suspect was driving an older dark colored four-door SUV, similar to a Toyota 4 Runner.


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