Renton police extend red-light camera grace period

The department is seeing motorists running red lights “at an abnormally high rate.”

Renton Police Department announced today it is extending the red light violation warning period at the three intersections where safety cameras were recently installed.

Since the installation of the cameras, the department is seeing motorists running red lights “at an abnormally high rate,” according to a press release.

RPD installed red-light safety cameras at the intersections of Park Avenue North and Logan Avenue North, Talbot Road South and South Grady Way, and Talbot Road South and South Puget Drive last month.

The department said they would issue a 30-day grace period where motorists would be issued a warning rather than a $124 citation. After observing large number of violations at those intersections, the department is extending the grace period until June 13.

“Once we started reviewing the warning videos we were really surprised by the number of motorists running the lights,” said Commander Chad Karlewicz in the release. “It was far worse than we expected. In the first three weeks of monitoring the warning violations there were two and a half times more violations at those three intersections as there was in the rest of the city in an entire month.”

Renton began its photo enforcement program in 2008, placing cameras at several key intersections and five school zones. Each area has signs indicating photo enforcement is in effect.

According to RPD, citations are only issued following police review and are sent to the vehicle’s registered owner. They will not applied to an individual’s driving record and are not recorded by the Washington State Department of Licensing.

Vehicle owners who receive a citation will have access to photographs of the violation and can challenge the citation.

The city contracts with American Traffic Solutions, Inc. to administer the program. More information on the program can be found at rentonwa.gov/photoenforcement.

“Our number one goal is to make everyone safer,” said Karlewicz. “We want to make sure everyone knows about these intersections and how dangerous they are and adjust their driving habits before they get to the point they are receiving citations.”


Talk to us

Please share your story tips by emailing editor@rentonreporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.rentonreporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) Please keep letters to 300 words or less.

More in News

South King County area police respond to Seattle protests

The responding officers are members of the multi-agency Valley Civil Disturbance Unit, officials say.

Kabal Gill, owner of East India Grill in Federal Way, wears gloves to hand over take-out orders at his restaurant on March 23. File photo
New guidelines for Phase 2 reopenings in King County

All workers will need to wear masks as restaurants, retail shops and other businesses reopen.

This undated file photo provided by U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows CDC’s laboratory test kit for the new coronavirus. Courtesy photo
Inslee wants nursing home residents and staff tested by June 12

Governor says state will pay for test kits and personal protective equipment.

Courtesy photo
How has COVID-19 affected Renton?

City has one of the highest rates of total cases in King County.

Stock image
Campgrounds to reopen in 22 Washington counties

Campgrounds in counties actively in Phase 2 of the reopening plan will begin to welcome visitors June 1, state says.

King County Sheriff Mitzi Johanknecht. FILE PHOTO
King County sheriff releases message about Minneapolis Police officer

Mitzi Johanknecht calls video of officer kneeling on neck of George Floyd ‘heartbreaking and disturbing’

File photo of construction near North Bend on Aug. 16. Sound Publishing file photo
                                File photo of construction near North Bend on Aug. 16. Sound Publishing file photo
Rural King County mayors want state to let them enter Phase 2

Mayors cite heavy economic damage from prolonged shutdown.

New dashboard shows how far along King County is to meeting Phase II metrics

The county has met more than half its goals, but the ones it hasn’t met are critical in determining how many people are still being infected, and how quickly people are being tested.

Most Read