Remi Frederick, a Village Green employee receives her first dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine on Jan. 26 in Federal Way. Olivia Sullivan/Sound Publishing

Inslee: We have vaccine capacity, we just need the doses

Despite continued frustration from those seeking a shot, the state is making progress, he said.

Washington has the capacity to administer more than 45,000 COVID vaccinations a day, Gov. Jay Inslee told reporters Feb. 4.

We just need the doses.

As of Feb. 4, the state was averaging about 28,000 shots daily. Vaccine access remains limited amid high demand.

“This is good news,” Inslee said. “This is twice the number we were doing just about two weeks ago.”

But with limited supply, appointments are still difficult to secure, despite the wide range of providers offering a dose. That has led to frustration for many who miss the window to secure the potentially life-saving shot.

“We promise, your turn is coming,” acting state Assistant Secretary of Health Michele Roberts said during a news briefing last week.

In total, providers across Washington had administered more than 770,000 shots as of Feb. 4.

This week, the state’s allotment for first doses was 107,000.

About 35% went to mass vaccination sites; 23% to hospitals; 19% to community health centers; 19% to pharmacies; and 3% to tribal governments.

Meanwhile, the state announced last week it is reducing shipments to 39 providers that failed to administer 95% of their shots within a week of receiving them. So far, state officials have declined to identify the providers.

“We don’t want to be punitive about this,” Inslee said. “It’s just we have found some providers don’t have the capacity to do the rate of vaccinations that we need, so we have opted to go with people who are more successful. These are kind of the hard decisions we have to make.”

The statewide supply should soon grow.

Last week, the federal government gave the state Department of Health its first three-week vaccine forecast, showing a steady increase in doses coming to Washington.

The state’s next shipment is expected to be about 207,000 doses. For the week starting Feb. 21, it’s expected to reach 240,620 doses.

And on Feb. 4, Johnson & Johnson asked the federal Food and Drug Administration for emergency approval of its single-shot COVID vaccine.

In December, the first doses of Pfizer’s and Moderna’s vaccines arrived in Snohomish County within two weeks of receiving the OK from the federal government.

Back in Olympia, Inslee said Pfizer believes it can double its production each month through February and March.


Talk to us

Please share your story tips by emailing editor@rentonreporter.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.rentonreporter.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) Please keep letters to 300 words or less.

More in News

Police vehicle damaged after collision (Photo Credit: Renton Police Department)
Renton Police still looking to arrest suspect after officer involved hit and run

RPD spokesperson said suspect fled on foot after causing officer’s injury.

A landslide in December 2019 created a crack in this Fall City road, allowing for a one lane entry and exit. Courtesy of King County Road Services
WA Legislature grapples with funding roads, bridges

Roads and bridges repair programs in King County are underfunded, and state… Continue reading

File photo
Proposed bill aims to trade handcuffs for help when it comes to drug use

Supreme Court decision to strike down drug possesion law leaves oppurtunity to shift paradigm

Washington State Capitol Building in Olympia. File photo
House passes bill to increase financial reporting, transparency by healthcare providers

Bill’s prime sponsor says it will help address healthcare equity and affordability.

“The Color of Flight,” designed and sculpted by Kirk Reese at Sunset Neighborhood Park (photo credit: Renton Municipal Arts Commission)
Renton Municipal Arts Commission is giving grants for community art projects

Grants will be awarded ranging from $500 to $10,000 in an effort to encourage community art.

Freshwater variety of kokanee salmon from Lake Sammamish. File photo
Encouraging numbers for kokanee salmon spawn count

Lake Sammamish kokanee aren’t out of the woods by any stretch, but… Continue reading

In this file photo, Tayshon Cottrell dons his graduation cap and gown, along with a face mask reading: “Wear it! Save America” at Todd Beamer High School’s virtual graduation walk recording on May 20, 2020, in Federal Way. Olivia Sullivan/Sound Publishing
Law gives Washington high school seniors leeway to graduate

Gov. Jay Inslee signed a bill that can waive some requirements for students who were on track before the pandemic.

Mercer Island School District first-graders returned to in-person classes on Jan. 19, 2021. Here, Northwood Elementary School students head into the building. Photo courtesy of the Mercer Island School District
Governor: Educators are now eligible for coronavirus vaccine

“This should give educators more confidence,” Jay Inslee said. Other frontline workers could soon be next.

Malden, after a wildfire burned down 80% of the town’s buildings in Eastern Washington. Courtesy photo
DNR commissioner seeks $125 million to fight wildfires

In Washington state last September, some 600,000 acres burned within 72 hours.

Most Read