Renton native propels submarine legacy into the future

  • Tuesday, April 2, 2019 9:15am
  • Life
Photo of Renton native Matt House by Mass Communications Specialist 2nd Class Brad Gee

Photo of Renton native Matt House by Mass Communications Specialist 2nd Class Brad Gee

By M. Dawn Scott

Navy Office of Community Outreach

As citizens of Renton go about their daily lives, members of the U.S. Navy’s “Silent Service” submarine force work beneath the ocean’s waves, continuing a tradition that only a small fraction of military members will ever know: strategic deterrence.

Petty Officer 1st Class Matt House assigned to USS Georgia hails from Renton, Washington, and is a 2011 graduate of Lindbergh High School who takes on the task to execute one of the Defense Department’s most important mission of strategic deterrence.

House is an electronics technician (nuclear) stationed at the Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, homeport to the Ohio-class ballistic-missile and guided-missile submarines.

“Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay is home to all East Coast Ohio-class submarines,” said Rear Adm. Jeff Jablon, commander, Submarine Group 10. “Team Kings Bay ensures our crews are combat ready when called upon, putting our submarine forces on scene, unseen.”

As an electronic technician, House performs duties in the nuclear propulsion plants operating reactor control, propulsion and power generation systems.

House credits continued success in the Navy to many of the lessons learned in Renton.

“I learned from my hometown that if you want something figure out how to get it,” House said.

Guided-missile submarines (SSGNs) provide the Navy with unprecedented strike and special operation mission capabilities from a stealthy, clandestine platform, according to Jablon. Armed with tactical missiles and equipped with superior communications capabilities, SSGNs are capable of directly supporting combatant commander’s strike and Special Operations Forces (SOF) requirements. The Navy’s four guided-missile submarines, each displace 18,750 tons submerged. Each SSGN is capable of carrying 154 Tomahawk cruise missiles, plus a complement of heavyweight torpedoes to be fired through four torpedo tubes.

House is part of the boat’s blue crew, one of the two rotating crews, which allow the boat to be deployed on missions more often without taxing one crew too much. A typical crew on this submarine is approximately 150 officers and enlisted sailors.

The first submarine was invented by Yale graduate, David Bushnell, in 1775 and provided the colonists with a secret weapon in the form of a one-man wooden craft in an experimental submarine that was nicknamed the Turtle.

Although Bushnell’s efforts were unsuccessful in attempts to blow up British vessels during the American Revolution George Washington said of the Turtle, “I then thought, and still think, that it was an effort of genius.”

U.S. submarines may not be what some have imagined. Measuring 560 feet long, 42-feet wide and weighing more than 16,500 tons, a nuclear-powered propulsion system helps push the ship through the water at more than 20 knots (23 mph).

Because of the demanding environment aboard submarines, personnel are accepted only after rigorous testing, according to Navy officials. Submariners are some of the most highly-trained and skilled people in the Navy. Regardless of their specialty, everyone has to learn how everything on the ship works and how to respond in emergencies to become “qualified in submarines” and earn the right to wear the coveted gold or silver dolphins on their uniform.

“The best part of this command is the ability to communicate upward and feel heard,” House said. “The communication is open up and down the chain.”

Serving in the Navy means House is part of a world that is taking on new importance in America’s focus on rebuilding military readiness, strengthening alliances and reforming business practices in support of the National Defense Strategy.

A key element of the Navy the nation needs is tied to the fact that America is a maritime nation, and that the nation’s prosperity is tied to the ability to operate freely on the world’s oceans. More than 70 percent of the Earth’s surface is covered by water; 80 percent of the world’s population lives close to a coast; and 90 percent of all global trade by volume travels by sea.

“Our priorities center on people, capabilities and processes, and will be achieved by our focus on speed, value, results and partnerships,” said Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer. “Readiness, lethality and modernization are the requirements driving these priorities.”

Though there are many ways for sailors to earn distinction in their command, community, and career, House is most proud of his highest achievement that involved an emergent repair off the coast of a country so that the boat to continue its mission.

As a member of one of the U.S. Navy’s most relied upon assets, House and other sailors know they are part of a legacy that will last beyond their lifetimes providing the Navy the nation needs.

“Serving in the Navy means being the difference you want to see, because you are always going to lead someone,” House said.


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