Answers may be hard to come

You’re on the edge of your chair.

Curiosity is almost killing you; there’s something you need to know but knowledge may be impossible. Truth may be hidden, though you follow every clue and learn what you can. You’re hanging, and you know the truth is somewhere but as you’ll see in the new book “The Death of Hitler: The Final Word” by Jean-Christophe Brisard and Lana Parshina, answers may be hard to come by.

It had been a long journey to Moscow.

For months, Brisard and Parshina had been gently petitioning the Russian government to allow them to see something that few others had ever seen. He, a Frenchman; she, a Russian-American, had been asking to see evidence of Adolph Hitler’s death, in the form of a piece of skull.

Born in 1889, Hitler was long dead by then: legend had it that he and his wife (some say mistress) poisoned themselves and their bodies were burned because Hitler was afraid of what the Russians would do to his corpse. Much like Elvis, however, sightings of a living Hitler were reported for years, post-WWII. Various spotters in several countries claimed to have seen the Nazi as an old man, but other document-supported eyewitness accounts led Brisard and Parshina to firmly believe that Hitler’s last days were spent more than 25 feet below-ground in a bunker with a handful of men, women and children, slowly losing his health and his mind.

The Russians held the proof.

It was early 2016 when Brisard and Parshina were finally allowed to view the evidence and documents. Immediately, they noticed that the cranial shard, the most tantalizing bit of clue, had clearly been pierced by a bullet that had probably caused its owner’s death. The owner, however, was unknown, and previous experts claimed it was from the skull of a younger woman. Other physical evidence tied the bone to Hitler. His own officers insisted that he’d taken cyanide. Dental evidence offered more clues.

“The mystery about Hitler’s death,” say the authors, “would remain unsolved for decades.”

But is it solved now? Jean-Christophe Brisard and Lana Parshina seem to think so, although they point out that no witnesses are alive for interrogation.

And yet, the evidence they’ve presented is intriguing enough to feel definitive and getting there is fascinating. “The Death of Hitler: The Final Word” rivals any fictional mystery, with plenty of back-story on Hitler and those who surrounded him in his last days. Those scenarios feel ominous, even though we know the outcome; they also sometimes feel too pat, as if they’re there to move the story along. What helps is that the authors pull readers into modern-day sleuthing often enough to keep their ground.

This book is very well-sourced, and it’s perfect for historians, World War II buffs, and mystery-lovers. Parts of it do feel recreated here, but it possesses a reassurance of truth and a positive air of authority. “The Death of Hitler: The Final Word” is a very good book, though the final word may still be hanging.

More in Life

See Binetti host Container Wars daily at show

Time to take a trip around the world — just by making… Continue reading

Illustrations by Rob McClurkan
Dr. Universe tells us how many bones dinosaurs have

Ask Dr. Universe is a science-education column from Washington State University.

Polo and Tugs got out of Monica Sauerwein’s house on Jan. 27. They were later found thatafternoon. Thanks to someone, Tugs was found and taken to a vet to see if he was chipped. Polo returned home on his own not long after. Submitted photo from Monica Saurerwein.
What to know about pet licensing

Licensing your pet is one of the best ways to ensure lost pets make it back home. Renton Animal Control and RASKC are important resources for pet owners in and out of Renton.

Search no more, you’ll want to read ‘Hero Dogs’

You felt like such a loser. It was a feeling that didn’t… Continue reading

Whether you like mystery or humor, this book has it for you

You didn’t recognize the number. So you didn’t answer the phone. That’s… Continue reading

Third times a charm? New restaurant set to open on MV highway

Weather permitting, Mezcal Fresh Mexican Grill opens Thursday, Feb. 7

Photo from the GoFundMe of some of the fallen trees
SHADOW Lake Nature Reserve wants your help

During the windstorm in early January, the boardwalk trail at the Shadow… Continue reading

Candy Cane Lane receives surprise donations

Folks gave $1,250 to go to a shed that will hold all the decorations

Urban Sprouts owner launches book Saturday

“The Inspired Houseplant” is meant to guide beginners through indoor plant life.

Four ways to celebrate spring in the winter

The beginning of February starts the gardening season – once you see… Continue reading

Illustrations by Rob McClurkan
Dr. Universe explains molecules

Ask Dr. Universe is a science-education column from Washington State University.

A book full of heart-pounding adventure, bravery, thrills and heroics

You never wanted to get caught. Wasn’t that the point of playing… Continue reading