Talking about transgender issues | OUR CORNER

It's looking like Washington's new bathroom laws are staying in place, for now.

It’s looking like Washington’s new bathroom laws are staying in place, for now.

It was announced Initiative 1515, which sought to reverse the laws in this state that allow a transgender individual to use restrooms and other facilities based on their gender identity did not receive enough signatures to get placed on the November ballot.

I was looking forward to it being on the ballot, mostly because the vote would settle the issue, and I was confident the initiative would not pass.

While I-1515 was still alive and kicking, I talked to several of my friends who identify as transgender and the many others who are heavily involved in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer community (LGBTQ+) about the new bathroom laws and the initiative.

There was one point that was consistently touched on during these discussions: the general public lacks the information and connections necessary to understand trans issues.

So while I-1515 did not receive enough signatures to get placed on the November ballot, there is still an information gap surrounding transgender issues that I would like to help fill.

Here’s the gist: Transgenderism isn’t about getting in touch with your feminine side (thanks for nothing, Mike Huckabee). Transgenderism is about expressing and internalizing a highly individualistic mix of physical traits and societal roles that lie outside the boundaries of what many people consider male and female.

Hm. OK, that was a little too clinical. Let’s break it down a bit more.

According to the state and the LGBTQ+ community, the term “sex” means your chromosomes XY for male, XX for female. A person’s sex does not change.

What can change is a person’s “gender identity,” which refers to the gender you associate with. For example, I strongly think of myself as male.

Since I have my XY chromosomes and I identify as male, I’m considered cisgendered (“cis” meaning “on the same side of”) which means my gender identity aligns with my sex.

“Transgender” means your gender identity does not match your chromosomes. A typical example is a transgender man who was born female (with XX chromosomes) but identifies as male or vice versa.

Still with me? Awesome, because here is where some people start to get lost.

The term “sexual identity” has nothing to do with your sex or your gender identity. It only means what sex (or gender identity) you’re attracted to.

Sexual identity for some is concrete; they’re full-on straight, gay, lesbian or asexual. For others, sexual identity is more fluid bisexuality is a common example.

Long story short gender identity describes who you are. Sexual identity describes who you like. Neither defines the other, and the only person who should be able to determine how you identify in either category is you.

Of course, I’ve really only scratched the surface of transgenderism, and I expect that while I’ve answered some of the more basic questions, more will inevitably rise.

So if you want to learn more about transgenderism, you’ll have to probably ask someone in the trans community. But there is a right and wrong way to do this.

Gender and sexual identity are extremely personal topics for many people, trans or not. I don’t walk up to just anyone on the street and ask them, “Hey, what do you identify as?” That’ll get real weird, real quick.

The first thing to understand is there is no single magical answer to all the situations you may encounter and the general tip is “don’t make assumptions.,” about gender, sexual identity, pronoun usage or other potential personal issues.

In my experience, the vast majority of trans people welcome conversations about their gender identity, so long as they feel they’re being respected and you genuinely want to learn about transgenderism.

They want other people to understand their identity, just like you would. So just be respectful, don’t assume, and hopefully, everyone will leave happy.

Of course, there are things to avoid doing when inquiring about transgenderism, and they all fall under the “don’t be creepy” and the “don’t be a jerk” umbrellas.

But while those are the basics, I think much of the uncertainty many people have toward the state’s current bathroom laws stem from a lack of understanding <span class="n_

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