Future of Renton’s kids is in the mail

Important pieces of mail have been arriving in the mailboxes of voters in the Renton School District.

Important pieces of mail have been arriving in the mailboxes of voters in the Renton School District.

Inside those envelopes is a chance to do something right for the kids of Renton – improve their school facilities and build new ones.

Before voters in this all-mail election is a $150 million construction bond measure. It failed in the March 11 special election when it fell just a few votes short of reaching the 60 percent “yes” vote. That’s why it’s just so important for those who care about Renton’s schools to cast a ballot. Every “yes” vote is important because of that supermajority rule.

Sure, to vote will cost the price of a 41-cent stamp. Just remember, on Monday the price of the stamp goes up to 42 cents. So save a penny today and get something priceless in return – the types of school facilities that students so richly deserve.

Or, go ahead and spend the 42 cents on Monday and beyond. Please just remember to vote.

Elections officials advise that if you didn’t receive a mail-in ballot that you call the elections office at 206-296-VOTE (8683) or go online to www.kingcounty.gov/vote.aspx.

There is no poll voting, although those who need assistance can vote in person at the King County Elections’ Renton office on Grady Way from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays or from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. on May 20, which is Election Day.

Please vote and please vote yes.

Healthy compromise

The Board of Commissioners of Public Hospital District No. 1 made a healthy compromise Monday when it voted to keep its meetings at 3:30 p.m.

The board oversees Valley Medical Center, whose reputation has taken some hits over a controversy involving a newly elected board member, Anthony Hemstad, and a failed annexation effort for the district.

Hemstad made public oversight of the hospital and the hospital board one of the hallmarks of his reform campaign.

The board’s decision not to move its meetings to 6 p.m. on Mondays should put behind it the controversies. Board chairman Don Jacobson and Hemstad have been at odds over Hemstad’s attendance record.

But the Jacobson-suggested compromise does exactly what it should. No matter what, the board will make itself available at 6 p.m. to take public comment. And Hemstad, who is Maple Valley’s city manager, will still be able to attend the board meetings, or at least part of them, before he has to leave for City Council meetings

Let’s hope this serves the public, which is what’s important.

More in Opinion

From left, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., House Financial Services Committee Chairwoman Maxine Waters, D-Calif., House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Eliot Engel, D-N.Y., and House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., announce they are pushing ahead with two articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump — abuse of power and obstruction of Congress — charging he corrupted the U.S. election process and endangered national security in his dealings with Ukraine, at the Capitol in Washington on Tuesday. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Will we feel different when Trump is impeached? Probably not

As a historic vote looms in the House, attitudes of the public are pretty hardened on this subject.

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