Pay the first half of your 2018 property taxes by April 30

After that date, interest charges and penalties will be added to the tax bill.

For The Reporter:

Property owners in King County have until Monday, April 30 to pay the first half of their 2018 property taxes. After that date, interest charges and penalties will be added to the tax bill.

To make the process easier, King County provides several ways for taxpayers to pay their taxes quickly and conveniently. Tax payments can be made:

  • Online using King County’s convenient, secure online eCommerce system. Taxpayers may pay accounts with a credit card or an electronic debit from a checking account.
  • By mail if postmarked no later than April 30, 2018. Taxpayers should include their tax statement and write the property tax account number on their check or money order. Cash should not be sent through the mail.
  • At King County Community Service Centers if paid by check for the exact amount due. Taxpayers can find the address, phone number, and operating hours of the center in their area by visiting kingcounty.gov/CSC.
  • In person at Treasury Operations, sixth floor of the King County Administration Building, 500 Fourth Ave. in Seattle. Hours are Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. On Friday, April 27, and Monday, April 30, Treasury Operations will be open until 5 p.m.

The online option provides immediate payment confirmation for current year or delinquent year(s) property tax bills. To pay online or view property tax information, taxpayers can visit kingcounty.gov/propertytax.

For questions about missing tax statements or other tax payment information, visit kingcounty.gov/propertytax, contact King County Treasury Operations by email at propertytax.customerservice@kingcounty.gov, or contact a customer service specialist at 206-263-2890.

Information on senior citizen exemption and deferral programs can be obtained from the King County Assessor’s Office at exemptions.assessments@kingcounty.gov or 206-296-3920.

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