Inslee and outrage

After the election of President Trump, many in Seattle and its surrounding communities let their anger be heard. Gov. Jay Inslee was one of them.

It became abundantly clear on Nov. 8, 2016 that Seattle is not a big fan of President Trump. Only 8 percent of the city’s votes went to him on election day. In King County, the number jumped to about 20 percent, but still: That’s a landslide of opposition. Activists and politicians from across Western Washington bellowed their outrage for the next … um, well, it’s still happening. And Governor Jay Inslee is among them. This week, Seattleland catches up with Inslee to process a tumultuous, anger-filled year, during which the Trump administration issued order after order that the governor vehemently disagrees with.

Music by Jahzzar, Lee Rosevere, and Leeni Ramadan.

This week’s cover photo was taken by Thomas Sørenes.

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