County Council sends Levy for Automated Fingerprint Identification System to Ballot

The AFIS levy will appear on the August 7, 2018 primary election ballot.

From a King County press release:

The Metropolitan King County Council today approved sending to the voters on the August primary election, a proposition to support continuation of the regional automated fingerprint identification system program (AFIS); the program that matches suspects to crimes through fingerprint identification technology.

“County voters will have the opportunity to continue supporting a system that protects our communities,” said Council Vice Chair Reagan Dunn.

AFIS, which is managed by the King County Sheriff, provides services to all local and county jurisdictions, the Seattle Police Department and all suburban Police Departments. AFIS uses a computerized system to store fingerprints and palmprints that can be accessed by law enforcement for solving crimes and identifying criminals.

“This is a renewal of a levy and will cost less than previous years!” said Councilmember Kathy Lambert. “It is an important tool for our law enforcement and helps move us into modern technology.”

“Since its creation in 1986, AFIS has helped our law enforcement agencies solve thousands of crimes and has promoted greater information sharing among governments, saving taxpayer dollars,” said Councilmember Claudia Balducci. “This renewal, to be considered by voters on the primary ballot in August, would continue this legacy of service at a lower rate of taxation than is being levied today.”

The AFIS levy renewal will fund the operation of systems and the technology to collect, search, and store fingerprints and palmprints in an electronic database. This database helps identify arrested individuals through fingerprint matching, solve crimes by identifying “latent” prints left at crime scenes, and establish criminal history. AFIS assists in the apprehension of criminal suspects and confirming the identity of individuals who are detained or booked into jail.

The levy that will be sent to the voters would authorize an additional property tax for six years beginning with a rate of $0.035 (3.5 cents) per $1,000 of assessed valuation for collection in 2019. If adopted, the levy is estimated to raise approximately $21 million a year for the AFIS program, at a cost of approximately $15.75 a year for the owner of a $450,000 home. The funds raised by the AFIS levy will be used for maintaining current operations, as well as annual costs of maintaining a new cloud-based system (costs associated with the system migration are covered under the existing levy).

The AFIS levy will appear on the August 7, 2018 primary election ballot.

More in Northwest

A young girl holds up a ‘Don’t Pollute I Live Here’ sign in the crowd during the Youth Climate Strike at Cal Anderson Park on Friday, March 15, 2019 in Seattle, Wash. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
King County builds blueprint for health, climate change

The plan will inform how the Board of Health addresses climate change-related health issues.

July’s Monroe earthquake is informing plans for future danger

Gathered by lucky accident, data from the 4.6-magnitude quake could help assess bigger hazards.

Courtesy of VFW Post 9430
                                Left to right: VFW Department of Washington Jr. Vice Commander Chad Hassebroek, Buffalo Soldier, life member of Skyway VFW Post 9430 and current post Guard Clyde Robinson, post Auxiliary President Cheryl Scheeler and post Cmdr. Larry Weldon.
A humble thank you for a life of honor

Buffalo Soldier presented honor quilt for Veterans Day

Renton students honor veterans

Courtesy of Renton School District. Students honored veterans in their lives and… Continue reading

Political activist Tim Eyman campaigns for Initiative 976 on Nov. 5 in downtown Bellevue. The initiative promised $30 car tabs while functionally eliminating the ability of agencies like Sound Transit to raise taxes for its projects. Photo by Aaron Kunkler
Election analysis: I-976 vote casts South King County against Seattle, Eastside

Preliminary precinct counts show support for the initiative split by region.

A King County judge found the company misled customers into thinking it was a charity. Photo courtesy of the state Attorney General’s office
Judge rules Value Village deceived customers

The King County judge found the company misled customers into thinking it was a charity.

Photo by Haley Ausbun. The Olde Fashioned Halloween Party, Saturday Oct. 26 in downtown Renton featured trick-or-treating, games prizes and the doggy costume contest.
Happy Halloween Renton!

Residents come out to play in fun costumes

The Cedar Hills Regional Landfill is the only active landfill in King County. It will operate until at least 2028. It has been in operation since the 1960s. Aaron Kunkler/staff photo
Study on shipping or burning King County trash released

The report fleshes out the two main options for trash disposal over the next 50 years.

A new study argues that many luxury apartment units in Seattle are vacant, damaging the surrounding communities. (Screenshot on Google)
Luxury apartments: Who’s buying King County?

Wealthy investors jack up housing prices in Seattle and beyond.

West Point Treatment Plant report due in January

The report will look at ways to keep adequate power flowing to the plant after a July spill.

Flying Fish: Lake Sammamish kokanee move to Orcas Island

It’s part of a program to preserve the unique freshwater salmon species.

Photo by Haley Ausbun. Garth Smith’s “final” sermon at Springbrook Church of Christ, Sunday, Oct. 13. At 90, he has been devoted to his faith, as well as his marriage, for over 70 years.
A birthday, an anniversary and one last homily

Garth Smith celebrates turning 90 with a message for his church family