Funding approved for flood reduction projects in and around Renton

The projects in the greater Renton area will cost more than $17 million.

Funding for a number of flood reduction projects in the city of Renton and unincorporated King County were unanimously approved Nov. 13 by the King County Flood Control District Board of Supervisors.

The projects in the greater Renton area will cost more than $17 million, according to a media release.

“These funds are key investments that will improve flood control infrastructure in neighborhoods to help protect at risk properties and key access roads,” said Reagan Dunn, chair of the Flood Control District, in the release.

The release added nearly $180,000 from the sub regional opportunity fund will go toward completing the dredging of the Cedar River.

“The removal of gravel and sediment in key flood prone areas around the city of Renton helps to protect downtown homes and businesses like Boeing’s Renton Facility,” the release stated.

A portion of the funds will also go toward protecting local roads and neighborhoods including the following projects:

• $900,000 to fund an assessment of flood reduction solutions around Jan Road including raising the road, partially removing the levee and constructing a side channel

• Nearly $11 million will go toward funding modifications to Jones Road to prevent flooding blocking access to nearby neighborhoods

• More than $5 million will fund improvements to the Herzman Levee

• $80,000 will also go toward addressing and preventing flooding in the May Creek area

Fairwood

Flood reduction projects in Fairwood nearing $2 million was also unanimously approved by the Board of Supervisors.

“I’m proud to support these commonsense investments in the community of Fairwood,” said Dunn. “Replacing these failed culverts and preventing flooding will be beneficial to both residents living in the area and the local environment.”

Two projects will benefit from this funding including nearly $500,000 toward replacing 200 feet of an existing four foot diameter pipe system that conveys Molasses Creek through a park and under the Fairwood Crest Division 11 neighborhood, the release stated.

And another $1.5 million will go toward replacing a culvert on Southeast 162nd Avenue, the release added.

This project will analyze replacement options for the failed culvert that impacts 10 nearby properties.

Fifteen Mile Creek Bridge

The Board of Supervisors also approved $230,000 to make improvements to the Fifteen Mile Creek Bridge on May Valley Road.

“The Flood Control District works in collaboration with local governments and the county’s Roads Division to help protect key pieces of infrastructure like the Fifteen Mile Creek Bridge,” said Dunn. “I’m glad these funds are going towards projects that will improve the safety of residents who use May Valley Road and Issaquah Hobart Road or who live near flood prone May Creek tributaries.”

The improvements to the bridge will come from an approved $150,000. “(The bridge is) a key piece of road infrastructure for those traveling on Issaquah-Hobart Road and May Valley Road,” the release stated.

The wanted improvements will upgrade the bridges ability to carry weight.

Construction on this project is expected to begin in 2018, the release added.

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