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State air quality plan open for public comment

A plan that demonstrates Washington’s ability to meet National Ambient Air Quality Standards is open for comment through the Washington Department of Ecology.

Ecology conducted a review of the existing Infrastructure State Implementation Plan in 2014. The results of the review showed that Washington’s infrastructure is sufficient to maintain, enforce and implement federal standards for nitrogen dioxide, ozone and particle pollution, but the plan needs to be revised.

The proposed revision of the infrastructure plan would add Ecology’s existing requirement to pay permit fees prior to permits being issued. This update will provide citizens and the Environmental Protection Agency the ability to enforce the fee requirement.

Public comments on the plan are being accepted through Aug. 27, 2014. Comments can be submitted by email to AQComments@ecy.wa.gov or by mail to Anya Caudill, Washington Department of Ecology, P.O. Box 47600, Olympia, WA 98504-7600.

To view updates visit: Infrastructure State Implementation Plan

Public hearing

The public can request a hearing by contacting Anya Caudill by email at anya.caudill@ecy.wa.gov or by phone at 360-407-6630. Requests must be received no later than Aug. 20, 2014.

If a hearing request is received by the deadline, it will be held at 6 p.m. on Aug. 26, 2014, at Ecology Headquarters: 300 Desmond Drive SE, Lacey. If a hearing request is not received, Ecology will announce a cancellation of the Aug. 26 hearing on its public involvement calendar.

After the public comment period has closed and comments have been reviewed, Ecology will submit the plan to EPA for approval. Once approved, the plan will be added to Washington’s comprehensive State Implementation Plan for protecting air quality.

About State Implementation Plans

Washington, along with other states, is required to maintain a statewide plan that ensures federal air quality standards (developed by the EPA) are met. An infrastructure state implementation plan specifically shows that Washington has the legal authority, regulatory structure, and resources to implement the National Ambient Air Quality Standards in all areas of the state.

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