Wildflower Season at Mount Rainier

A Rainier wildflower guide

  • Tuesday, August 7, 2018 11:36am
  • Life

The following a press release:

While every season is Rainier season, summer is bursting with color! One of the most spectacular aspects of Mount Rainier National Park is its world-renowned wildflower meadows. No matter what the length of your stay, a stroll among these seemingly endless fields of wildflowers is a must-do. Each summer avalanche lilies, paintbrush, asters, daisies, cinquefoil, fireweed, purple shooting stars and so many others, blanket the mountain in every color of the rainbow.

Wildflower Viewing Tips

Best Time: Late-July to Early-August

Best Places: Paradise, Sunrise and Chinook Pass/Tipsoo Lake

For Hikers: Top 10 Wildflower Trails

Etiquette: Please do not pick the flowers and stay on the trails

Status Report: Get the Park’s Latest Wildflower Update

Top 4 Wildflower Viewing Locations

Paradise: Someone once stated, “a trip to Paradise is going to heaven before you die.” Wildflowers in every shade sway in the breeze, filling meadow upon meadow with brilliant colors. A network of sixteen trails skirt around these meadows. A great choice is the paved Skyline Trail, departing from the visitor center, providing fabulous flower views and it’s suitable for the whole family. Other area hikes with fantastic flower displays are Spray Park, Van Trump Park, and Indian Henrys.

Sunrise: On the other side of the mountain, visitors to Sunrise will witness a true alpine ecosystem. Sitting at 1,000 feet higher than Paradise, this ecosystem is especially fragile. In summer, mountain meadows abound with wildflowers; the Sourdough Ridge Trail is a popular, easy 2 ½ mile hike. At their height in summer, visitors can see acre upon acre of vivid wildflowers, with swaths of lupine, paintbrush, and red mountain heather.

Chinook Pass/Tipsoo Lake: Many photographers say that the wildflowers at Tipsoo Lake rival anything found at Paradise. Located at the summit of Chinook Pass, this subalpine lake, and surrounding area is simply a wildflower seeker’s dream. Stroll through fields of vibrant color – the yellows, oranges, pinks, and purples of lupine, Indian paintbrush, partridge foot and many others set a dramatic scene. Easy area nature trails meander near the lake offering dazzling views of these world-class wildflower meadows. For a longer day hike, take the Naches Peak trail.

Crystal Mountain Resort: Crystal Mountain is not part of Mount Rainier National Park, but it is part of a national forest and right now they have wildflowers. Visitors can see the wildflowers by a scenic gondola ride, hike, or guided trail ride. Plus the trails and the gondola are dog-friendly in the summer! Dogs are not allowed on the trails in Mount Rainier National Park but they are allowed on the trails at Crystal Mountain Resort.

More in Life

Elementary students learn financial literacy skills

Financial literacy: it’s something even older adults can struggle with. Credit, taxes,… Continue reading

Renton parkrun celebrates its first birthday with a free 5k

The following an invitation from Renton Parkrun: If you haven’t heard yet,… Continue reading

Illustrations by Rob McClurkan
Dr. Universe explains what makes a pepper hot

Ask Dr. Universe is a science-education column from Washington State University.

There’s still time to celebrate fall color by adding a maple

November is a great time to celebrate fall color— not too late to move a tree or plant a new one.

Local Allstate agencies collect donations for military families and veterans, and give $30,000 to the USO Northwest

The following from the Allstate Foundation: To celebrate Veterans Day, Allstate agencies… Continue reading

Photos, maps, fun facts make this book addicting

You know? Of course you do, because you’re no dummy. You’re on… Continue reading

Photo courtesy of Kelsie Gardner
                                Kelsie and her mom participating in a previous Teal and Toe walk.
Girl Scout raises ovarian cancer awareness and receives Gold Award

The Renton local received her Gold Award last year for her efforts

Summer bloomers can’t handle our winter weather

Cut back your summer-blooming annuals or just pull them and toss into the compost pile

Illustrations by Rob McClurkan
Dr. Universe explains wasabi

Ask Dr. Universe is a science-education column from Washington State University.

Most Read