Reminder: Aug. 31 is deadline to nominate Washington companies for state honor

Secretary of State Kim Wyman, third from left, front row, and past winners of the business award. COURTESY PHOTO

People have until the Aug. 31 deadline to nominate a Washington company for a 2017 Corporations for Communities Award.

Nomination forms can be found at sos.wa.gov/corps/corpsforcommunities.

Past nominations included charitable activities like paid time for employee volunteer work, sponsoring and organizing fundraisers, matching of employee giving efforts, direct cash and in-kind donations, and building a community of giving within their organizations.

Winners will be announced in late September, with an awards ceremony taking place in Secretary of State Kim Wyman’s office later in the fall. Wyman will present the award-winning companies with a National Association of Secretaries of State Medallion, the highest national honor awarded by NASS.

Wyman said: “We are lucky to have many Washington companies that are committed to giving back in different ways. This award program gives people a chance to help recognize these companies that contribute to local causes, and I encourage people to submit a nomination by the 31st.”

Anyone can nominate businesses for the award. Any for-profit corporation, limited liability company (LLC) or limited partnership is eligible for the award. Nominees need to be registered with the Office of Secretary of State and must be in compliance with state and federal laws.

For more information about the awards program, contact program coordinator Patrick Reed at (360) 725-0358 or patrick.reed@sos.wa.gov.

The Corporations for Communities program began in 2009 as a way to recognize exceptional Washington businesses that demonstrate a commitment to giving in order to improve local or regional social and environmental conditions. The program is run by the Corporations & Charities Division, which is part of the Office of Secretary of State.

More in Business

From preliminary plans for the new Topgolf location in Renton, courtesy of the city.
Topgolf to bring high-tech driving range to Renton

Construction is expected to be complete in 2021, according to the land-use notice.

Muckleshoot Indian Tribe to develop luxury hotel at Auburn casino

Opening in 2021, dynamic resort experience to meet guest demand, the tribe says

Lawmakers need to re-examine budget before adjourning

Before lawmakers wrap-up their work in Olympia, they should re-examine their hefty… Continue reading

Inconvenient truth about batteries

Each year Americans throw away more than three billion batteries constituting 180,000… Continue reading

Darker side of renewables

Before our country, in haste, dives totally into renewable energy, we must… Continue reading

Oil companies betting on electric technology

Across the pond, London-based BP and Netherlands-headquartered Shell are looking to invest… Continue reading

Trade issues coalesce Washington’s delegation

Historically, international trade issues have galvanized our state’s congressional delegation. Many wondered… Continue reading

Henry Beleford displays photos of current high school students have come through his shop to get their letterman jackets. Beleford said once they graduate, he takes their photos down. Photo by Sarah Brenden
Local shop owner helps students show school spirit

What started out as a part-time gig has turned full time for… Continue reading

Microsoft has expanded their AccountGuard service to 12 new European Countries. Yellow: European countries already protected. Blue: European countries now protected. (Source: Wikimedia Commons)
Microsoft warns of hacking ahead of elections

Launching defense services in Europe.

The Heaven Sent location in downtown Renton closed its doors after eight years. Photo by Haley Ausbun
Heaven Sent leaves Renton

Heaven Sent Fried Chicken closed its doors Feb. 23. Owner says he’s focusing on Everett store and a gluten-free menu

Praerit Garg joins Smartsheet as CTO

Bellevue-based company employs 760 people

OfferUp founder Nick Huzar makes customer safety a core pillar

Bellevue-based CEO wanted a simpler solution to his own problems